Dissertation excerpts

M. Everett Lawson

This is a stick figure.  The world we perceive around us is an incomplete image, of not only what we’ve built, but the inherent potentials we have yet to unlock in our biology.  We are surrounded by displays.  We move through time in confined cockpits.  Our realities are defined by what we are capable of perceiving.  The way in which we deliver information to the senses will define how we build the future.

Communication technologies and their potentials for extended application lend rich opportunities to activate receptive fields in the human visual system. Peripheral vision has long been targeted as an opportunistic space for its potential to expand available real estate for information delivery. Flicker, for example, is highly detectable peripherally, but as a binary system is ill-suited for alphanumeric characters or complex symbol cognition.  Peripheral shape discrimination is feasible with similar sensitivities as in central vision but requires an increase in shape size with increasing eccentricity from central fixation for accurate detection.  This dissertation demonstrates a foundational approach to peripheral information delivery capable of conveying highly complex symbols via motion-modulated stimuli within a series of small, static apertures in the far periphery ( > 50°).  Methodologies described here utilize perceived position shifts as a medium toward a new visual language, conveying complex information and representational characters well outside established limits of symbol recognition while occupying comparatively little spatial real estate in both pixel space and retinotopic projections onto discrete regions of the retina.

Peripheral semantics

This research demonstrates a foundational approach to peripheral semantic information delivery capable of conveying highly complex symbols well beyond the established mean, using motion-modulated stimuli within a series of small, static apertures in far periphery ( > 50°).

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Stimulus preparation

Adapting stimuli to dynamic environments One of the greatest challenges of adapting motion-modulated semantics to real-world environments is maintaining requisite conditions for effects to occur. 

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© 2020 M. Everett Lawson.